Ukraine

Situation Report

Highlights

  • Eastern Ukraine remains the centre of hostilities, while airstrikes and missile attacks continue to be reported in multiple oblasts in Ukraine.
  • Humanitarian conditions deteriorate while needs grow, primarily in southern and eastern Ukraine, with wide-scale disruptions to electricity, gas and water supplies.
  • Municipal authorities and the World Health Organization warn of the potential outbreak of diseases, including cholera, in Mariupol due to unsanitary conditions.
  • As of 12 May, the UN and humanitarian partners have reached over 6.4 million people in need across Ukraine.
  • Over 5.7 million people received food assistance and 1.5 million health-related support from the UN and humanitarian partners since 24 February.
12 April 2022. Novoselivka village, north of Chernihiv, Chernihivska oblast, Ukraine.
People affected by the recent fighting in the village of Novoselivka, north of Ukraine, are standing next to a humanitarian aid distribution point. 12 April 2022. Novoselivka village, north of Chernihiv, Chernihivska oblast, Ukraine. Photo credit: OCHA/Serhii Korovayny

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Ukraine

Situation Report

Key Figures

15.7M
People in need
8.7M
People targeted
6.4M
People reached as of 12 May 2022
8M
Internally Displaced Persons
6.3M
Refugees

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Ukraine

Situation Report

Funding

$2.2B
Required
$1.4B
Received
61%
Progress
FTS

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Contacts

Saviano Abreu

Head of Communications Unit (a.i.)

Lizaveta Zhuk

Head of Reporting

Ukraine

Situation Report
Visual

Situation Overview Map (as of 18 May 2022)

Situation Overview Map (as of 18 May 2022)

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Situation Report
Analysis

Situation Overview as of 12 p.m. on 18 May

General humanitarian situation. Intense fighting continued in eastern Ukraine throughout the reporting period, especially in Luhanska oblast (east), while airstrikes and missile attacks were reported almost daily in several oblasts across the country. On 17-18 May, hostilities in Luhanska oblast were reported to move closer to its administrative centre – Sievierodonetsk. It was also reported that at least four civilians had been killed and one injured and that there had been more significant damage to civilian housing and infrastructure. While Luhanska oblast has been the most affected by hostilities, active fighting and air attacks have also been reported in eastern Donetska and Kharkivska oblasts. Throughout the week, there were also reports of airstrikes elsewhere, often hitting infrastructure but also residential areas and resulting in civilians being killed and injured. Namely, the strikes reportedly affected an oil refinery in Poltavska oblast (centre), residential homes in Zaporizka oblast (south-east), the energy infrastructure in Dnipropetrovska oblast (centre), a residential building, kindergarten and other buildings in Sumska oblast (north-east), residential areas of Chernihivska oblast (north), railway infrastructure in Lvivska oblast (west) and a private house in Mykolaivska oblast (south).

Meanwhile, in southern Khersonska oblast, humanitarian needs are growing – especially for medicines, food and cash – as active hostilities have been reported as continuing around Vysokopilska hromada, south of the Government-controlled Kryvyi Rih (Dnipropetrovska oblast). On 14 May, a gas pipeline was reportedly damaged in Stanislav (west of Kherson city). Moreover, on 16 May, Kherson Mayor said that medicines would run out in two weeks, adding that oxygen supplies were also limited. The oblast authorities have reported disruptions to electricity and water supplies as well as to cell phone and online services in both Government-controlled and non-Government-controlled areas (GCA and NGCA), and that food is running low in some places. The need for cash and medicines is also widespread. The authorities have also been calling for safe corridors to evacuate civilians and deliver humanitarian aid. Reportedly, however, residents have only limited freedom of movement within the oblast and are not allowed to leave new NGCA areas, while volunteers with humanitarian aid are not allowed to enter. There was a report on 17 May of some civilians waiting for several days in a kilometres-long queue of vehicles – trying to drive north out of Khersonska oblast. There have also been reports of evacuation efforts in other areas.

Civilian casualties and damages to civilian infrastructure.According to the Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights (OHCHR), as of 17 May, the number of civilian casualties stands at 7,964 in the country: 3,778 killed and 4,186 injured, according to OHCHR. More than half (4,326) of all casualties so far verified have been recorded in GCA and NGCA of Donetska and Luhanska oblasts. The actual number of civilian casualties across Ukraine is likely considerably higher, as the receipt of information from some locations where intense hostilities have been going on has been delayed, and many reports are still pending corroboration.Separately, Ukraine’s Prosecutor General reported on 13 May that there had so far been over 640 child casualties of the war, including 226 children reportedly killed and another 420 injured. The Prosecutor General’s Office said that most of the casualties, 139, had been registered in Donetska oblast, followed by 116 in Kyivska (north) and 99 in Kharkivska oblasts and that there were also significant numbers in Chernihivska (north), Khersonska, Luhanska, Mykolaivska (south) and Zaporizka (south-east) oblasts. The UN conducts independent verification of civilian casualties, which might differ from the number of civilian casualties reported by the UN Member States.

The Joint Centre for Control and Coordination (JCCC) in Donetska oblast (NGCA), on its official website, maintains a database of war damage, listing daily damage to infrastructure and social facilities in the NCGA of Donetska oblast, including medical facilities, educational institutions, social and production facilities (i.e., garages, workshops, administrative offices, grocery stores, etc.), critical infrastructure facilities (i.e., hazardous materials storage, transformer sub-stations, water storage, etc.), and electricity, water and gas supply facilities. The records show damage recorded since the beginning of 2022, however, the figures have not been independently verified by the UN. As reported, the majority of the damage has occurred since 24 February. Since the beginning of 2022, as of 18 May, 3,466 residential buildings have been damaged. In addition, 729 civil infrastructure facilities have been affected, including nearly 320 electricity, water and gas supply facilities, over 210 social and production facilities, more than 120 educational institutions, over 40 medical facilities and more than 25 critical infrastructure facilities.

The London-based charity Action on Armed Violence (AOAV) reported on 12 May that at least three people had been killed and 19 others injured in an airstrike that hit a school in Novhorod-Siverskyi (Chernihivska oblast). Reportedly, several air-fired missiles hit a school building and a boarding school, and the resulting fire also damaged an administrative building and a number of houses. The report also cites Ukraine’s First Lady, Olena Zelenska, saying that, while it has been claimed that only military facilities are being targeted, the war is deeply impacting the country’s children. Overall, according to theUkrainian Ministry of Education and Science, as of 18 May, 1,604 education facilities across the country have been damaged and 144 destroyed.

War crimes allegations. Human Rights Watch (HRW), in a new report published on 18 May, confirmed that evident war crimes were committed in Chernihivska and Kyivska oblasts from late February through March when civilians were subjected to “summary executions, torture, and other grave abuses.” HRW said that, in 17 villages and small towns visited last month, it investigated 22 apparent summary executions, nine other unlawful killings, seven cases of torture, and six possible enforced disappearances, and that 21 civilians described unlawful confinement in inhuman and degrading conditions. HRW said that it also interviewed 65 people between 10 April and 10 May – including former detainees, torture survivors, families of victims, and other witnesses – and examined physical evidence as well as photos and videos. The report specifically describes the apparent war crimes as having been committed in areas that were, at the time, under the control of the Russian Federation military and concluded that they “should be promptly and impartially investigated and appropriately prosecuted.”

Access to water and sanitation. The situation with access to water remains particularly dire in the eastern part of the country, while the possibility of restoring water supplies and bringing in water remains limited. Local authorities in Mariupol (Donetska oblast) recently warned that thousands of people could die there simply as a result of the poor sanitary conditions caused by the war, including weeks of bombardments and encirclement. They report that as many as 170,000 residents remain in the devastated port city, mainly older people, people with disabilities and people who are ill. Mariupol City Council said that conditions are ripe for the outbreak of diseases among an already-weakened population with only limited or no access to water, sanitation, medicine and health care. On 17 May, the World Health Organization (WHO) specifically warned that an outbreak of cholera might occur in Mariupol because of the poor quality of the drinking water there. It was said that NGOs have reported how sewage water can be mixed with drinking water in the city. WHO said that, as a result, it is prepared for the spread of diseases, especially cholera, including by having vaccines ready.

Moreover, local authorities in Luhanska oblast say as electricity was disconnected across most settlements controlled by the Government of Ukraine due to hostilities, a dependable water supply has not been available across the GCA of Luhanska oblast for over a week. The situation with the water supply is also reportedly critical in the NGCA of Donetska oblast, where, according to NGCA sources, remaining water reserves for the largest NGCA city — Donetsk — are sufficient only for 20-25 days. Moreover, according to public sources, the city of Mykolayiv (Mykolaivska oblast) had no drinking water supply for several consecutive days due to water pipeline damage, with constant shelling making repair work challenging. By 9 May, the water supply was reportedly gradually restored to taps but remained unsafe for drinking.

Environmental impacts. Ukraine’s Ministry of Ecology and Natural Resources, in its report as of 12 May, outlines what it describes as the environmental impacts that the war has so far had on the country, including damages to nuclear facilities and the threat of radiation, damages to infrastructure and industrial sites as well as pollution, and damages to natural reserves and protected ecosystems, freshwater resources as well as to the Azov and Black seas. The report explains that the Ukrainian Government is seeking to record, as in other areas, the impacts of the invasion, and specifically on the environment, partly to be able to protect its citizens, strengthen international cooperation and appeal for justice. The Ministry notes, for example, that, on 3 May, the Ukrainian Parliament adopted a law concerning Ukraine’s accession to the Convention on the Transboundary Effects of Industrial Accidents as a way to be able to better cooperate internationally in environmental protection.The report also says that remediation work is ongoing at the Chornobyl nuclear power plant and in the Chornobyl Exclusion Zone(Kyivska oblast) following hostilities and the presence of the military there. It points out that Zaporizhzhia nuclear power plant (Zaporizka oblast) is now located in an area no longer controlled by the Ukrainian Government. The ministry report also describes how the war, among other impacts, has deprived some 4.6 million Ukrainians across the country of access to safe drinking water and 1.4 million people, particularly in eastern Ukraine, of access to any water supply. Separately, it was reported, including by the governor of Donetska oblast, that shelling on 16 May had caused a massive explosion at a warehouse near Izium in neighbouring Kharkivska oblast – a warehouse housing ammonium-nitrate, typically used in fertilizers and explosives. He added that while the explosion, which produced a huge column of reddish-coloured smoke, did not pose any immediate health risks to residents, an environmental assessment was being carried out.

Food security. Ukraine’s Ministry of Foreign Affairs has reported that at least 400-500 thousand tons of grain worth some US$100 million were seized from farmers in areas of the country that are currently not controlled by the Government of Ukraine. The Ministry said that such actions only contribute to the food insecurity brought on by the war. It further said that, according to unconfirmed reports, the grain is illegally being transported by ship for sale abroad.

Meanwhile, according to the World Food Programme (WFP), before the war, most of the food produced by Ukraine – enough to feed 400 million people – was exported through the country’s seven Black Sea ports. In the eight months before the war began, close to 51 million tons of grain passed through them, WFP says. Recognizing how the closure of Ukraine’s seaports affects food security globally, WFP called for the immediate reopening of Black Sea ports – including Odesa (Odeska oblast, south) – so that critical food from Ukraine can reach people in dire need in countries affected by humanitarian crises.

Impacts on economics. On 17 May, the report Ukraine: Joint Market Monitoring Initiative - April 2022 was published by the REACH Initiative, providing information on price trends and market functionality indicators in Ukraine. The authors explain that, given the mass displacement and humanitarian crisis resulting from the war and further given the prominence of multipurpose cash as a modality for assistance, market monitoring is key to ensuring that humanitarian intervention is effective, sustainable and does not harm local economic systems. Consequently, the Joint Market Monitoring Initiative – conducted in partnership with the Ukraine Cash Working Group – seeks to fill the current information gap by providing timely data on price trends and market functionality indicators. Categories in the report include a range of related topics, including people’s ability to access shops and markets, prices for a typical “food basket,” the functioning of banks and payment methods accepted. More details from the report are provided under the Cluster sections below.

Impacts on LGBTIQ+ people. On 17 May, the Protection Cluster and the UN Refugee Agency (UNHCR) published the report Protection of LGBTIQ+ People in the Context of the Response in Ukraine, focusing on the particular impacts of the war on LGBTIQ+ people, such as in accessing humanitarian assistance. The report notes in part that, even before the start of the military offensive in February, LGBTIQ+ people in Ukraine could be subject to hate speech, discrimination, harassment and abuse. Now, the report continues, they are often at heightened risk of exclusion, exploitation, violence and abuse and encounter distinct protection risks– adding to barriers in accessing humanitarian assistance and services such as safe accommodation, appropriate health care, gender-based violence (GBV) prevention and response services, education and livelihoods opportunities. The report concludes in part that it is important that humanitarian actors and service providers understand and address such risks through tailored programmes to ensure LGBTIQ+ people displaced and/or affected by the war in Ukraine enjoy equal rights.

Impacts on humanitarian actors. ODI – Humanitarian Policy Group has published the report Navigating Humanitarian Dilemmas in the Ukraine Crisis, outlining the many wide-ranging challenges humanitarian actors face due to the war and its impacts. Those challenges, the report outlines, range from the shifting and escalating nature of the hostilities around the country, civilian casualties, the massive displacement, increases in commodity prices, food insecurity, the loss of basic services, including energy, and attacks on health care. The report goes on to detail how humanitarian needs and the ability to respond to them vary according to context, including fighting in contested areas of the country, conditions in non-Government-controlled areas, the influx of IDPs into certain areas of Ukraine, and neighbouring countries’ capacity to host millions of refugees.

Displacement. Continued hostilities and deteriorating conditions have continued to fuel displacement across Ukraine while the possibility of organizing evacuations from some of the hardest-hit areas remained limited. Between 11 and 17 May, at least 1,000 people were reported to have been evacuated around the country, including on 14 May, when a convoy of 1,000 vehicles reportedly arrived in Zaporizhzhia (Zaporizka oblast) after having travelled from Mariupol. During the reporting period, there were also reports of continued efforts to evacuate civilians from other parts of Donetska oblast and from Luhanska oblast (east), though they were not always possible because of intense fighting. Between 14 and 17 May, more than 100 people were reportedly evacuated from Luhanska oblast, including over 70 on 17 May. The UN cannot verify the number of evacuated people.

On 16 May, the International Organization for Migration (IOM) published the results of an area baseline assessment conducted between 15 and 30 April of 75 hromadas hosting internally displaced persons (IDPs) in Lvivska and Zakarpatska oblasts in western Ukraine to gather initial trends on the number of registered IDPs.The assessment contains information on almost 170,000 arrivals to the two western oblasts, with the majority of people arriving from Donetska, Kyivska and Kharkivska oblasts. IOM explains such assessments support the targeting and provision of humanitarian assistance.

As of 17 May, the estimated number of people displaced by the ongoing war stands at 14.3 million. According to UNHCR, over 6.3 million people have crossed into neighbouring countries to date. The majority of people have crossed into Poland (nearly 3.4 million), followed by Romania (over 930,000 people) and the Russian Federation (over 860,000). Earlier, IOM reported that 8 million people were displaced internally as of 3 May. Separately, the Russian Federation reported that, since 24 February, more than 1.3 million people, including more than 227,000 children, have crossed into its territory. The UN does not have the means to verify the reported number of people who crossed international borders reported by the UN Member States.

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Situation Report
Trends

Funding as of 12:00 p.m. on 18 May

Following the decision by the Humanitarian Coordinator to launch a third Ukraine Humanitarian Fund (UHF) reserve allocation on 21 April, the UHF, Clusters received and reviewed 32 projects submitted by UHF partners – national NGOs (13 projects worth $16.5 million), international NGOs (12 worth $21 million) and UN agencies (seven worth $17.8 million) – for a total budget of over $55 million. Twenty-six of the submitted projects were recommended for endorsement for a total amount of approximately $45 million, pending further technical and budgetary review. At the moment, partners are revising their project proposals in line with recommendations provided by the reviewing bodies. Meanwhile, the revision of the second reserve allocation and cost extension of the current projects continues.

As of 18 May, the Flash Appeal with a funding requirement of $2.25 billion is over 59 per cent funded, with $1.3 billion received. OCHA is working with partners and donors to increase the details available regarding funding received, which has improved during the previous week. Currently, more than $775 million – 58 per cent of total reported funding – is either allocated to multiple clusters or the sector information is not specified on the Financial Tracking Service, preventing a more detailed analysis of the funding gaps by Cluster.

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Situation Report
Trends

Humanitarian Response as of 12:00 p.m. on 18 May

As of 12 May, the UN and humanitarian partners have reached over 6.4 million people across Ukraine, with the majority of people reached currently residing in Kharkivska (1.52 million), Kyivska (543,700) and Poltavska (484,800) oblasts. Over 5.7 million people have received food and livelihood assistance, an increase of 1 million people over the previous week, and over 1.5 million have benefitted from health interventions or supplies provided by humanitarian partners. A more detailed breakdown of assistance by sector is included in the Cluster sections below.

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Situation Report

Cluster Status

Camp Coordination and Camp Management (CCCM)

Needs

  • Over 1.1 million people will need safe access to multisectoral services at the site level between March and August 2022.

  • According to REACH’s mapping exercise conducted in support of the CCCM Cluster activities, the most frequently cited needs of IDPs were non-food items (NFI), food, hygiene and cleaning items, medical supplies and equipment, as well as information about employment opportunities.

  • The latest Norwegian Refugee Council (NRC) Rapid Assessment of a Selection of Transit Centres on the South-Eastern Poland-Ukraine Border highlighted the need to improve the provision of information on access to services, legal information and counselling, capacity for safe identification and referral at border crossing points and transit sites, and cash registration at transit sites for the most vulnerable households. In particular, improvement is needed at the Medyka border crossing point, which has the highest number of people in transit but the least developed infrastructure.

Response

Gaps

  • According to REACH’s mapping exercise conducted in support of the CCCM Cluster activities, the constant displacement of families and fluidity of IDP movements has been a significant challenge to acquiring timely and accurate data on the numbers, locations, and needs of IDPs staying in collective sites across Ukraine, limiting the effectiveness of humanitarian assistance planning and implementation.

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Situation Report

Cluster Status

Education

130k
people reached

Needs

  • Hostilities are impacting 3.6 million children as a result of the nationwide closure of schools and educational facilities. The ability to learn is severely affected by acute and ongoing exposure to conflict-related trauma and psychological stress leading to a risk of school dropout and negative coping mechanisms.

  • According to Rapid Gender Analysis of Ukraine conducted by UN Women and Care International, education has mostly moved online, with the burden of homeschooling falling mainly on mothers, who also must deal with air raids, evacuations and continued displacement, all of which interfere with homeschooling.

  • Roma girls and women, who were already disadvantaged in terms of access to schooling, will most likely face further

    challenges that will have long-term effects on their access to opportunities, including livelihoods and services.

  • The Ministry of Education and Science has shared a list of prioritized projects for support from the international community.

Response

  • As of 12 May, Education Cluster partners have reached nearly 130,000 people, 8 per cent more compared with 5 May. The majority of people reached currently reside in Zakarpatska (53,300), Kharkivska (23,100) and western Ivano-Frankivska (18,000) oblasts.

Gaps

Nothing significant to report.

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Cluster Status

Emergency Telecommunications

Needs

  • Telecommunications infrastructure remains operational throughout most of Ukraine. There are reports of hacking and jamming of telecommunications means in the country and localized outages in areas of heavy fighting.

Response

  • As of 16 May, the ETC Cluster has provided secure internet connectivity services to 124 staff from 10 humanitarian organizations, including UN agencies and international NGOs, in two inter-agency office locations in Dnipro (Dnipropetrovska oblast) and Lviv (Lvivska oblast). On 13 May, the ETC extended secure internet connectivity services to cover a humanitarian workspace on an additional floor of the building in Lviv to protect humanitarians’ data from cyber threats.

Gaps

  • Security and access are expected to be major constraints in the ETC’s ability to implement telecommunications solutions within Ukraine. The risk of cyber-attacks in Ukraine remains high.

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Situation Report

Cluster Status

Food Security and Livelihoods (FSL)

5.7M
people reached by FSL Cluster partners

Needs

  • Some 10.2 million people across Ukraine are estimated to be in need of food and livelihood assistance between March and August 2022.

  • According to WFP, over one-third of Ukraine’s population is food insecure. Southern and eastern oblasts are most affected: the highest prevalence of food insecurity was registered in Luhanska oblast.

  • In a Ukraine Joint Market Monitoring Initiativepublished by REACH and conducted in partnership with Cash Working Group, 87 per cent of respondents reported full availability of food items at the national level, but regional differences were observed: 31 per cent of respondents in the south reported limited availability of food items and 14 per cent in Kyiv. No issues were reported in the western and central oblasts. Nearly 60 per cent of respondents in southern oblasts reported that movement restrictions related to martial law negatively impacted their ability to access markets and shops. In Odesa, the centre of the city is reportedly closed off. In southern oblasts, 48 per cent of interviewed customers reported feeling unsafe either at the market or on the way there.

  • The Cluster received a request from the Ministry of Agrarian Policy and Food of Ukraine to allocate funding and means of production countrywide, namely: (i) to provide funding during the sowing campaign for small farmers (up to 100 hectares), particularly for the purchase of seeds, fuel, plant protection products and fertilizers; (ii) to allocate seeds of vegetable plants and soybeans for the period of spring fieldwork; (iii) to allocate seeds of winter wheat for the period of autumn fieldwork; (iv) to ensure the conservation of cattle stock and maintenance of biodiversity (the estimated livestock coverage in this area will be 200,000 cows); and (v) to allocate drugs and means for the urgent needs of veterinary medicine and the development of animal husbandry. Detailed longlists have been provided to the FSL Cluster partners for their follow-up.

Response

  • As of 12 May, FSL Cluster partners have reached over 5.7 million people with food assistance, 21 per cent compared with the previous week. The majority of people were reached in Kharkivska (1.5 million), Poltavska (484,800 people) and Kyivska (543,700) oblasts.

  • Working to ensure food security and livelihoods for vulnerable families in rural Ukraine, the UN Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) has delivered potato seeds to vulnerable rural families, providing aid to about 46,000 people (17,740 households) in 10 oblasts during the spring sowing campaign. In total, 862 tons of seed potatoes have been delivered, with each household receiving 50 kg of seed potatoes, which will produce about 600 kg of potatoes in the fall. About 15 tons of seed potatoes were delivered to 300 households in Lvivska oblast. In Dnipropetrovska oblast, 3,690 households received seed kits. Plans have been made to provide over 14,600 rural families (38,000 people) with vegetable-growing kits to resume food production for consumption and sale, distribute poultry and support vulnerable livestock producers by providing animal feed and vitamin and mineral supplements. Agriculture is one of the main sectors of Ukraine’s economy and provides the main source of income for 12.6 million people living in rural areas, almost a third of the country’s population. Such assistance is of key importance for the country’s food security.

  • Three humanitarian organizations have reported ongoing or completed distribution of Emergency Agricultural Inputs in 18 oblasts, reaching over 47,500 vulnerable people since 24 February.

  • As of 16 May, WFP continues to ensure the availability of bread for crisis-affected people through support to bakeries, reaching over 2 million people, mostly in Kharkiv (Kharkivska oblast), as well as Sumy (Sumska oblast), Poltava (Poltavska oblast), Chernihiv (Chernihivska oblast) and other cities. More than 3.7 million loaves of bread have been distributed across eight cities in Ukraine, equivalent to 1,850 tons. Daily bread distribution has been supplemented with the provision of canned meat in Kharkiv and Dnipro.Rapid response rations were delivered to over one million vulnerable people in Dnipro, Kharkiv, Kyiv and other cities to help meet immediate food needs. General Food Distribution (GFD) has been scaled-up, assisting over 443,000 residents and IDPs in sustaining access to nutritious food for up to 30 days.

  • WFP reached more than 1,000 Roma women, men and older people with GFD packages.

  • An operational Working Group for Food Assistance was established to align existing pipelines of humanitarian aid and ensure a more coordinated response.

Gaps

  • The lack of unimpeded, continuous access to affected and encircled areas of Ukraine, including the city of Mariupol, is hampering the delivery of critical food assistance.

  • Supply chain disruption, caused by ongoing fighting, has reduced food availability and rendered market functioning unpredictable.

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Cluster Status

Health

1.52M
people reached

Needs

  • Some 12.1 million people in Ukraine are estimated to be in need of health assistance between March and August 2022.

  • According to the Health Cluster, key health concerns for the conflict-affected population over the course of the next three months are non-communicable diseases (NCDs), crisis-attributable injuries, sexual and gender-based violence (SGBV), mental health and psychosocial health, and infectious diseases. In addition, reduced access to health care and medicines due to hostilities is likely to worsen the health status of the population. Crisis-attributable injuries and trauma cases are already placing strain on health facilities and increasing long- and short-term rehabilitation support needs. The active hostilities and COVID-19 pandemic are exacerbating chronic mental health problems and causing high levels of acute psychological distress among all age groups.

  • Limited access to health care and medicines, destruction of infrastructure, inadequate vaccination coverage, lack of adequate sanitation and hygiene, as well as population movements and crowding, are affecting infectious disease prevention and treatment programmes.

  • In a Joint Market Monitoring Initiative published by REACH and conducted in partnership with the Cash Working Group, 61 per cent of respondents countrywide reported full availability of medication, but regional differences were observed: 57 per cent of respondents in Kyiv reported limited availability of medication and 25 per cent in southern oblasts. In the south, one in four respondents (26 per cent) reported that medication is unavailable.

Response

  • As of 12 May, Health Cluster partners have reached over 1.5 million people, 2 per cent more compared with 5 May. The majority of people reached currently reside in Kyivska (327,600), western Chernivetska (215,500) and Ternopilska (211,700) oblasts.

  • As of 11 May, WHO has delivered 485 tons of medical supplies, comprising trauma and emergency surgery kits, interagency emergency medical supplies (IEHK), blood transfusion materials, essential medicines, and other critical supplies, including body bags, ambulance vehicles, power generators, refrigerators and other equipment. The emergency surgery kits delivered are sufficient to cover up to 16,000 surgeries and IEHK items to serve an estimated 650,000 people for three months. Of the 485 tons of medical supplies, 195 tons have been delivered to aid recipients in 20 oblasts across Ukraine.

  • International Medical Corps (IMC) and a local partner have provided medical services to over 5,500 people, including primary care, neurology, endocrinology, urology, orthopaedics, obstetrics, paediatrics, and others, in the cities of Brovary and Irpin, as well as in other cities of Kyivska oblast.IMC also supports a network of health-care facilities in Odesa and five health-care facilities, including a hospital dedicated to managing tuberculosis patients in Chernihivska oblast,, as well as provides pharmaceuticals, consumables and other necessary materials. IMC also established an emergency response hub in Dnipropetrovska oblast to respond to needs in Donetska, Luhanska, Kharkivska and Zaporizka oblasts.

  • A MedGlobal team of four US physicians completed a third successful medical mission to Ukraine between 3 and 6 May, delivering medical supplies and ultrasound machines worth $200,000 and training 150 Ukrainian physicians in six different hospitals. The training focused on polytrauma, triage,focused assessment with sonography in trauma (FAST exam), blast injury and ultrasound. MedGlobal has distributed medical supplies and medications worth over $900,000 to frontline hospitals, which will benefit over 20,000 patients.

  • IOM continues to expand support for affected persons with four mobile medical clinics providing primary health care services to IDPs and host communities in Lvivska oblast. Between 4 and 10 May, IOM provided over 160 medical consultations and 100 psychological consultations, initial consultations and psychological first aid to over 126 persons, short to medium-term counselling sessions and psychotherapy to over 65 persons, and psychiatrist consultations with 8 women.

  • Médicos del Mundo (MdM) has assisted more than 220,000 people through donations of life-saving medicines to health facilities in Ukraine. MdM has assisted 21 health facilities and is preparing to provide assistance to another 27 health facilities. Distribution of maternity kits in Luhanska oblast is ongoing: over 650 maternity kits have been distributed and further distribution is underway in Kirovske and Pervomaiske. Another six emergency medical kits have arrived in Chernivtsi (Chernivetska oblast), each containing basic medical care for 10,000 people for three months. They are being sent to Dnipropetrovska, Donetska and Kharkivska oblasts and to the Kyiv city for distribution.

  • To respond to requests for assistance, the Health Requests, Planning and Response (HRPR) tool was developed by the Health Cluster to enable organizations and health facilities to log their requests. This tool also allows the Health Cluster secretariat to engage with partners who are able to respond to the requests. Nearly 90 requests have already been logged with the new tool since its launch on 15 April.

Gaps

  • According to WHO,access to health careis severely impacted due to security concerns, restricted mobility, broken supply chains and mass displacement. Health care continues to come under attack (including attacks against health facilities, transport, personnel, patients, supplies and warehouses), with 235 verified attacks on health care, resulting in 58 injuries and 75 deaths between 24 February and 18 May. Reaching some of the hardest-hit areas in the east, where health systems have been severely disrupted, remains a challenge. Fuel shortages and access problems continue to pose challenges to the delivery and distribution of medical supplies.

  • The risk of disease outbreaks, such as cholera, measles, diphtheria or COVID-19, has been exacerbated due to the lack of access to water, sanitation and hygiene, crowded conditions in bomb shelters and collective centres, and suboptimal coverage for routine and childhood immunizations.

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Cluster Status

Logistics

Needs

  • The most recent Logistics Cluster survey (as of 3 May) on constraints faced by the humanitarian community received responses from 61 organizations. Results show that organizations using light vehicles are the most heavily affected by fuel shortages.

Response

  • As of 15 May, the Logistics Cluster has handled (i.e., stored and/or transported) 11,000 m3 of humanitarian cargo on behalf of 23 partner organizations. Cargo comprised relief items from multiple sectors (FSL, health, nutrition, etc.), as well as items required for the continuation of operations.

  • The Logistics Cluster has updated its Concept of Operations (ConOps). Further revisions may take place following the outcomes of the Gaps and Needs Analysis exercise, which is currently underway.

  • WFP has a dedicated team working on the in-country fuel supply challenges. The Logistics Cluster is providing updates as and when available. A short questionnaire on organizational fuel requirements has been disseminated to partners to support WFP operational planning for fuel provision to humanitarian partners.

  • The Logistics Cluster is facilitating transport from Dnipro to Mykolaiv in support of last-mile distributions to southern areas.

Gaps

  • Fuel shortages across the country are impacting the operational capacity of humanitarian organizations.

  • There are reports of congestion at border crossing points in Poland and Romania, with higher reports of congestion outgoing from Ukraine. The Logistics Cluster is working with partners to gather additional information and is monitoring the situation.

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Ukraine

Situation Report

Cluster Status

Nutrition

62k
people reached

Needs

  • Some 600,000 people in Ukraine are estimated to need nutrition support between March and August 2022.

Response

  • As of 12 May, Nutrition Cluster partners have reached 61,600 people, 4 per cent more compared with 5 May. The majority of people reached currently reside in Dnipropetrovska (13,300), Donetska (12,500) and Odeska (8,300) oblasts.

  • Some 166 tons of complementary cereal have been procured by WFP to date, out of which over 31 tons were distributed to around 15,680 children aged 6 to 23 months in Chernihivska, Dnipropetrovska, Poltavska and Zaporizka oblasts to support their growth and development.

  • The Nutrition Cluster reported that, in March–April, six organizations that provide nutrition-related assistance in 17 oblasts distributed complementary foods for nearly 39,500 children aged 6–23 months and nutrition items for over 19,600 pregnant women, while more than 347,000 people were reached with public messages on infant and young child feeding.

  • As of 16 May, WFP have distributed 37 tons to around 18,500 children aged 6 to 23 months in Chernihiv, Dnipro, Poltava and Zaporizhzhia. The remaining 130 tons are in-stock, transit or expected to be delivered soon for distribution to an estimated 67,500 children in May.

Gaps

Nothing significant to report.

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Ukraine

Situation Report

Cluster Status

Protection

428k
people reached

Needs

  • Some 15.7 million people are estimated to be in need of protection assistance and services between March and August 2022, including 2.1 million children, 3.3 million people in need of protection services mitigating the risks and outcomes of gender-based violence (GBV), and 14.5 million people in need of mine action-related assistance.

  • According to the Protection Cluster, human trafficking in Ukraine was known to be widespread before the war, but since 24 February, indications show an increased risk of trafficking due to loss of income and resources, loss of homes and inadequate/non-family style accommodation, family separation, psychological distress, disruption to education, breakdown of law and order, conflict-related sexual violence, amongst others. A rapid assessment conducted by La Strada International and Freedom Fund in March-April 2022 suggests that the risks will increase as the war continues, and as more people are internally displaced, access to services and livelihoods becomes more precarious, and millions of refugees resettle for longer periods in other European countries and begin accessing the labour market. In response, new Terms of Reference have been published for the Anti-Trafficking Task Force in Ukraine, which is expected to work on tackling these challenges.

Response

  • As of 12 May, Protection Cluster partners have reached a total of 427,800 people, 15 per cent more compared with 5 May. The majority of people reached currently reside in Lvivska (52,400), Kyivska (44,300) and Kharkivska (35,500) oblasts.

  • From 5 to 11 May, UNHCR and partners conducted 88 protection monitoring missions in Zakarpatska oblast, also distributing NFI to over 1,500 people. On 11 May, UNHCR’s partners Right to Protection and Rokada provided 38 protection and 28 legal consultations in Chernivetska oblast (west). 

  • UNHCR reported that, as of 16 May, over 170,000 people received targeted protection assistance and information at border crossing points, transit and reception centres, and through hotlines.

Gaps

  • Referral pathways for GBV survivors are not fully functioning in many locations, and access to police services is limited.

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Ukraine

Situation Report

Cluster Status

Shelter and Non-food Items (NFI)

307k
people reached

Needs

  • Some 6.2 million people are estimated to be in need of shelter and NFI between March and August 2022.

  • According to the latest round of IOM’s Internal Displacement Report, housing needs remain high among IDPs, with 11 per cent reporting the need for accommodation and 3 per cent indicating that accommodation was their most pressing need. In settlements hosting IDPs, apartments are reported as ‘difficult’ or ‘very difficult’ to find in western and central oblasts. Rent prices reportedly continued to increase in most assessed settlements.

Response

  • As of 12 May, the Shelter/NFI Cluster has reached over 307,000 people, 16 per cent more compared with 5 May. The majority of people reached currently reside in Donetska (62,800), Lvivska (38,000), and Chernivetska (32,500) oblasts.

  • As of 12 May, IOM has distributedor is set to distribute over 316,000 NFI to people in need in 20 oblasts.

  • UNHCR reported that, as of 16 May, it has delivered 455 hygiene kits, 1,000 mattresses, 1,000 blankets and 1,000 solar lamps for people located in bomb shelters in Kharkiv.  

  • As of 17 May, the Estonian Refugee Council has, together with one of its partners, distributed 4,600 sleeping bags in Zaporizka oblast.

Gaps

Nothing significant to report.

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Ukraine

Situation Report

Cluster Status

Water, Sanitation and Hygiene (WASH)

352k
people reached

Needs

  • Some 13 million people in Ukraine are in need of water, sanitation and hygiene assistance between March and August 2022.

  • In a Joint Market Monitoring Initiative published by REACH in coordination with Cash Working Group, 79 per cent of respondents reported full availability of basic hygiene items (soap, toothpaste, washing powder, sanitary pads, diapers) countrywide. Regionally the highest availability of hygiene items was reported in central and western oblasts, while in southern oblasts, only 53 per cent of respondents reported full availability of basic hygiene items and 31 per cent reported limited availability.

Response

  • As of 12 May, WASH Cluster partners have reached over 352,300 people, 26 per cent more compared with 5 May. The majority of people reached currently reside in Donetska (91,200), Luhanska (79,200) and Sumska (27,700) oblasts.

Gaps

Nothing significant to report.

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Ukraine

Situation Report

Sector Status

Multipurpose cash (MPC)

655k
people received cash assistance

Needs

  • According to an update published by the Protection Cluster, food was the most commonly reported envisaged usage of financial support (76 per cent of IDPs, 66 per cent of non-IDPs); health came second (amongst respondents who identified a need for financial assistance).MPC was the preferred modality in the majority of IDP-hosting settlements, while in-kind assistance was preferred in IDP-hosting settlements located closer to areas affected by hostilities.

  • In a Joint Market Monitoring Initiative published by REACH in coordination with Cash Working Group, 59 per cent of respondents reported full availability of bank services in their location, but only 33 per cent of respondents in southern oblasts reported full availability of bank services, and 11 per cent of respondents reported that bank services are unavailable. Countrywide, 13 per cent of respondents reported that ATMs are not available in their community, while one in five respondents in southern oblasts reported that the number of functional ATMs is highly limited or that ATMs are not functional.

  • Ukrposhta, an important provider of financial services for pensioners in Ukraine, has an established financial infrastructure across Ukraine that could be used to deliver humanitarian cash and voucher assistance. As of 30 April, Ukrposhta reported that their offices are not functional or have limited functionality in Donetska, Kharkivska, Khersonska, Luhanska, Mykolaivska and Zaporizka oblasts, as well as in some areas previously affected by hostilities in Kyivska oblast.

Response

  • As of 18 May, Cash Working Group partners have distributed MPC assistance to 655,000 people, with the total amount transferred estimated at $109.8 million.

    As of 10 May, IOM had provided MPC assistance to 64,000 displaced persons.

  • As of 16 May, UNHCR reports that 331,000 people had registered to receive cash assistance, and over 166,600 people had received their first payments.

    To date, WFP has transferred nearly $15.6 million to more than 231,000 IDPs in 14 oblasts across Ukraine.

  • The Estonian Refugee Council has reached over 28,000 households (85,000 individuals) with MPC, mostly in Dnipropetrovska, Donetska, Kharkivska, Khersonska, Kyivska, Lvivska, Poltavska, Sumska and Zaporizka oblasts.

Gaps

Nothing significant to report.

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