Ukraine

Situation Report

Highlights

  • As active fighting continued in the east and south of the country, partial mobilization was announced in the Russian Federation.
  • The so-called referendums on joining the Russian Federation were scheduled to take place in non-Government-controlled areas of Donetska, Khersonska, Luhanska & Zaporizka oblasts.
  • In a village in Kharkivska oblast back under the Government’s control, four health workers were reportedly killed while evacuating patients of a psychiatric hospital.
  • Also in the areas of Kharkivska oblast back under Ukraine’s control, humanitarians have delivered two convoys with critical supplies.
  • Across Ukraine, nearly 580 humanitarian partners have provided life-critical aid and protection services to 13.4 million people.
Sumska oblast
Humanitarian Coordinator for Ukraine Denise Brown, centre, observes damaged buildings and the impacts of the war in the northern Sumska oblast during a mission to assess needs and coordinate response. (OCHA/Hilary Stauffer, 21 September 2022)

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Ukraine

Situation Report

Key Figures

17.7M
People in need
11.5M
People targeted
13.35M
People reached as of 15 September 2022
7M
Internally displaced people
7.4M
Refugees in European countries

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Ukraine

Situation Report

Funding

$4.3B
Required
$2.9B
Received
67%
Progress
FTS

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Contacts

Saviano Abreu

Head, Communications and Reporting Unit

Lizaveta Zhuk

Public Information Officer

Ukraine

Situation Report
Visual

Situation overview map

SitRep map

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Ukraine

Situation Report
Analysis

General security and humanitarian situation

During the reporting period, the fighting and shelling continued in the east and south of Ukraine, with multiple civilian casualties and damage to civilian infrastructure reported. Meanwhile, in the Russian Federation, the partial mobilization was announced on 21 September, and the so-called referendums on joining Russia were scheduled to take place between 23 and 27 September in the non-Government-controlled areas (NGCA) of Luhanska and Donetska oblasts, as well as in parts of Zaporizka and Khersonska oblast invaded after 24 February. At the same time, humanitarian access in the areas of Kharkivska oblast back under the Government of Ukraine’s control has notably improved, allowing humanitarian organizations to organize several aid convoys.

The most-intensive fighting continued to take place in Donetska oblast, where nearly 100 civilian casualties were reported just over the three-day period (16, 17 and 18 September)– 47 in Government-controlled areas (GCA) of the oblast, including in Bakhmut, Kostiantynivka and Kramatorsk, and 51 in NGCA, including in the cities of Donetsk, Horlivka and Makiivka. More civilian buildings, such as houses and schools, were also reportedly damaged by shelling, including the Kramatorsk Hotel in the centre of the Government-controlled city. And on 19 September, shelling in the centre of Donetsk city and in two other settlements was reported to have resulted in the deaths of 10 people and injuries of 13 more.

Still in eastern Ukraine, deadly shelling was reported in the newly accessible areas of Kharkivska oblast, including north of Kharkiv and along the international border with the Russian Federation. Governor Oleh Syniehubov reported that four health-care workers were killed in shelling on 18 September while evacuating patients and residents of a psychiatric hospital in the village of Strilecha, located at the border with the Russian Federation. Before the shelling began, some 30 people had been reportedly evacuated, with 600 more waiting to be evacuated when the security situation permitted. Later, on 21 September, the Governor updated that all the patients and residents of a hospital were evacuated to Kharkiv, including with the support of the Ukrainian Red Cross Society. Separately, on 20 September, the Governor reported that two civilians had been killed and nine more, including four children, injured in Hrushivka, south-east of Kharkiv. And, also in the east, there were reports of renewed fighting and shelling in Luhanska oblast, such as on 19 September when seven civilians, including three children, were reported to have been killed in Krasnorichenske, just east of the borders with Kharkivska and Donetska oblasts.

Hostilities continued to be reported elsewhere, also resulting in civilian casualties and damage to civilian infrastructure – including energy infrastructure. Four civilians, including two children, were reported to have been killed on 16 September in Kherson, located in the NGCA of the southern Khersonska oblast. It was reported that missile strikes on 19 September in and around Government-controlled Zaporizhzhia, in the south-eastern Zaporizka oblast, caused damage that included electricity infrastructure and resulted in power disruptions.

On 19 September it was reported that hostilities had affected one of Ukraine’s four nuclear power plants (NPPs), when operator Energoatom said that there had been a missile strike just 300 metres from the South Ukraine NPP in GCA of the southern Mykolaivska oblast. Meanwhile, regarding Zaporizhzhia NPP (ZNPP) in NGCA of Zaporizka oblast, on 15 September, the 35-nation Board of Governors of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) adopted a resolution highly critical of the ongoing presence of the Russian Federation Armed Forces and Russian authorities at the plant – and calling for “the competent Ukrainian authorities to regain full control over all nuclear facilities within Ukraine’s internationally recognized borders, including ZNPP, to ensure their safe and secure operation.” In a separate update on 19 September, IAEA Director General Rafael Mariano Grossisaid the situation at ZNPP remained “fragile and precarious” while adding that “today’s explosion near the South Ukraine NPP all too clearly demonstrates the potential dangers also at other nuclear facilities in the country – any military action that threatens nuclear safety and security is unacceptable and must stop immediately.”Two days later, on 21 September, Energoatom reported that shelling had again directly impacted the Zaporizhzhia plant – damaging communication equipment and causing the emergency start-up of safety systems.

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Situation Report
Analysis

Civilian casualties and damage to civilian infrastructure

The Human Rights Monitoring Mission in Ukraine (HRMMU) verified, as of 18 September, at least 14,532civilian casualties – with 5,916 people having been killed and 8,616 injured. Among those killed were 2,306 men, 1,582 women, 188 boys and 156 girls – and among the injured were 1,810 men, 1,327 women, 259 boys and 187 girls. Most civilian casualties continued to be recorded and verified in the eastern Donetska and Luhanska oblasts – 56 per cent or a total of 8,222 casualties, including 3,540 people killed and 4,682 injured. HRMMU also stressed that it believes the actual figures are much higher.

News during the week involved the reported discovery of an improvised burial ground containing at least 440 bodies in the city of Izium in the newly accessible areas of Kharkivska oblast. At least some of the people buried there were reportedly believed to have been civilian victims of shelling and air strikes in the first weeks of the war – while at least some were said to have been shot. The UN Office for the High Commissioner for Human Rights (OHCHR) was reported saying on 16 September that UN investigators “would be looking to see if those buried were soldiers or civilians and whether they had died in hostilities or from natural causes.”

There were also reports of multiple civilian casualties this week resulting from landmine explosions in the areas of Kharkivska oblast back under Ukraine’s control. The Governor reported that six people were injured in three separate incidents just on 18 September, and he called on residents to be extra careful. A humanitarian security report also recommended that aid workers follow the instructions of local authorities when visiting the newly accessible areas, have mine-awareness training and wear personal protective equipment.

Concerning the damage to infrastructure caused by the war in other parts of Ukraine, the UN Satellite Centre (UNOSAT) published a series of maps on 15 September. A map of Mariupol in NGCA of Donetska oblast shows that when the city is divided into cells using a satellite imagery-based Rapid Damage Building Assessment (RDBA), 22 per cent of the cells sustained visible damage. A map of the Azovstal steel plan in Mariupol indicates that 75 per cent of the structures there sustained damage. An RDBA map of Donetsk city indicates that well under 1 per cent (0.17) of the cells sustained damage. North-west of Kyiv, in the northern Kyivska oblast, 27 per cent of the cells in an RDBA map of Bucha contain damaged buildings, 58 per cent of the cells in an RDBA map of Hostomel indicate damage, and 71 per cent of the cells in an RDBA map of Irpin also indicated damaged structures – while only 1.4 per cent of the cells in an RDBA map of the western part of the capital, Kyiv, show damage. Separately, the REACH Initiative and the UN Refugee Agency (UNHCR) on 14 September published an infographic assessment on the risk of flooding following the missile strike that damaged the Karachunivske Reservoir dam near Kryvyi Rih in Dnipropetrovska oblast earlier that day.

Ukraine’s Energy Ministry updated 20 September that, even while work continues to restore power supplies disrupted by the war, approximately 773,000 households and businesses across Ukraine currently remain without power. The Ministry confirmed that most of those without electricity are in the eastern Donetska (about 415,000 users), Kharkivska (144,000) and Luhanska (128,000) oblasts, followed by the southern Mykolaivska oblast (30,000). And the Energy Ministry added that almost 600,000 users across Ukraine currently lack gas supply, including some 357,000 in Donetska oblast. And the International Rescue Committee (IRC), in a 13 September press release, confirmed conclusions – that between the ongoing hostilities, damaged infrastructure and limited utilities – the coming winter will be especially hard for Ukrainians.

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Situation Report
Analysis

Forced displacement

On displacement, Ukraine’s Ministry for the Reintegration of the Temporarily Occupied Territories reported on 18 September that, over the last month, approximately 82,000 people were evacuated from some of the most war-affected parts of Donetska, Kharkivska, Khersonska, Mykolaivska and Zaporizka oblasts. The Ministry credited over 20 volunteer groups and NGOs – including Helping to Leave, Help People, Proliska and Vostok SOS – with having supported the evacuation efforts, and it said that the most vulnerable people had been prioritized.

According to the latest International Organization for Migration (IOM) Area Baseline Report (Round 11) published on 15 September, Dnipropetrovska, Kharkivska and Kyivska oblasts have the highest numbers of displaced people, each hosting over 300,000 registered internally displaced people. Of the total number of internally displaced people, the majority have been displaced from Donetska, Kharkivska and Luhanska oblasts. A decrease in the numbers of registered internally displaced Ukrainians has also been observed in several western oblasts: Ivano Frankivska, Lvivska and Zakarpatska. And IOM said this reflects de-registrations by locally registered internally displaced people and is likely due to them returning to their habitual residences or resettling elsewhere. But evacuations continue from the east and south of Ukraine and are expected to pick up speed as winter approaches. IOM also highlighted that the numbers presented in this report likely represent an undercount of those who were forced to flee their homes. Overall, within Ukraine, nearly 7 million are estimated to be internally displaced, while another 7.4 million have sought refuge abroad.

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Situation Report
Emergency Response
Türkiye
Aid workers unload urgently-needed supplies from an humanitarian convoy to Shevchenkove, which is back under the control of the Ukrainian Government, in the eastern Kharkivska oblast. Photo: OCHA, 16 September 2022

Humanitarian response

The UN and its humanitarian partners continue to scale up their response efforts to meet the growing humanitarian needs of nearly 18 million people across Ukraine. Since 24 February, 13.35 million people have received some form of humanitarian assistance and protection services. Please refer to the sections below for more information on the ongoing and completed response in different sectors.

In the areas of Kharkivska oblast back under the Government of Ukraine’s control, OCHA has successfully facilitated the delivery of two humanitarian convoys with critical supplies in recent days. On 16-17 September, the first in a series of humanitarian convoys reached Shevchenkove, 80 km south-east of Kharkiv. The convoy brought food, water, hygiene kits, shelter materials and critical household items, including bedding and blankets, from the International Organization for Migration (IOM), the UN Children’s Fund (UNICEF), the UN Refugee Agency (UNHCR), the World Food Programme (WFP) and the World Health Organization (WHO). Humanitarian Coordinator for Ukraine Denise Brown said that, while the UN and its humanitarian partners have been providing assistance to people in Government-controlled areas of Kharkivska oblast since the start of the war and have already reached over 2 million people there, they were prevented for more than five months, until now, from doing so in areas that were under the control of the Russian Federation and which have only recently become accessible.

The convoy coincided with a mission by Ms. Brown to northern Ukraine and the newly accessible areas on 19-22 September to provide leadership in the response efforts, strengthen engagement with local authorities and engage with the UN agencies and partners. And on 20 September, a second UN-organized convoy delivered aid to Chuhuiv, some 40 km south-east of Kharkiv. The 11-truck convoy carried critical medical supplies, bottled water, solar lamps, tarpaulin, over 3,000 thermal blankets, 3,000 bedding kits, hygiene kits and kitchen sets for over 2,000 families – provided by IOM, UNHCR, UNICEF and WHO.

In a wider view of the humanitarian response to the Ukrainian crisis so far, a report by the France-based NGO Groupe Urgence-Réhabilitation–Développement (Groupe URD) was posted on 16 September – based on having “conducted a real-time evaluation of the humanitarian response to the war in Ukraine, in order to record lessons from the initial response, and to inform later decision-making.” And in a similar wide-reaching perspective, on 15 September, UN Nutrition reported on how the “war in Ukraine shows the increasing impact of intersecting crises” around the world – including in terms of nutrition and hunger, and how the UN and its partners have been responding.

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Situation Report

Cluster Status

Education

339K
children

Needs

  • Some 5.7 million school-aged children have been affected since the start of the war, including 3.6 million due to the closure of educational institutions. The ability to learn is severely affected by acute and ongoing exposure to conflict-related trauma and psychological stress leading to a risk of school dropout and negative coping mechanisms.

  • The new academic year started on 1 September in Ukraine, with educational institutions at all levels resuming their learning activities in different modalities (offline, distance learning and mixed) to ensure wider accessibility as well as safety. According to the information shared by the Ministry of Education and Science (MoES), 27 per cent of schools resumed face-to-face learning, 43 per cent distance learning and 30 per cent mixed modality (face-to-face and distance learning). Across the country, there are 24,423 preschools and general secondary schools available.

  • According to the MoES, by 1 September, only 56 per cent of all educational institutions (universities, schools, preschools, etc.) had approved shelters and were ready to resume offline studies, including 64 per cent of schools and 70 per cent of higher education institutions. While the construction and improvement of shelters are ongoing, many educational institutions still lack adequate bomb shelters.

  • The share of schools offering offline or mixed learning increased compared to the previous academic year when 95 per cent of hromadas reported applying exclusively online learning modality across all educational institutions. Yet, there is an anticipation that online learning might return in the localities where the security situation deteriorates. Furthermore, there is a concern that lack of heating during winter might push schools to go on forced breaks or switch back to an online format.

  • Based on the needs assessment conducted by the Education Cluster and MoES in June, there have been at least 164,000 internally displaced learners. Ivano-Frankivska, Khmelnytska, Kyivska, Lvivska, Vinnytska and Zhytomyrska oblasts currently host the majority of the internally displaced learners, while Kharkivska, Kyivska and Zaporizka oblasts have reported the highest teachers outflow rates, with 43,000 teachers displaced by the war.

  • According to the information provided by education authorities in some oblasts, most internally displaced learners continue to study remotely in their host institutions, and only some internally displaced learners study in person in the new places of residence.

Response

  • Around 243,000 children, half of whom are girls, and close to 73,000 teachers were reached with educational support activities and activities related to the improvement of the teaching and learning environment.

  • Close to 290,000 school-aged children, half of whom are girls, benefited from self-learning assistance, psychological support, distribution of learning kits, recreational materials and repairs or rehabilitation of learning spaces.

  • Some 63,000 teachers and other educational personnel were trained on psychosocial support and referral mechanisms for children, as well as other professional and pedagogical skills. This number tripled compared to two weeks ago.

  • Over 23,000 young children (3-5 years) were provided with Early Childhood Development kits and play-based learning materials.

Gaps

  • According to the Ministry of Education and Science (MoES), 2,528 educational facilities were affected by hostilities (more than 5 per cent of the total), including 285 destroyed.

  • Due to ongoing hostilities, a back-to-learning campaign for the new academic year is currently underway, focusing on continued education instead of schools’ reopening.

  • The lack of bunkers and early warning alarm systems connected to schools delays the resumption of in-person learning, as these MoES requirements must be met for schools to reopen.

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Situation Report

Cluster Status

Food Security and Livelihoods (FSL)

1.7M
people reached, 23 August-5 September

Needs

  • Some 9.3 million people are in need of food and livelihood assistance from March–December 2022.

Response

  • Between 22 August and 5 September, 28 Cluster partners reached 1.7 million people with in-kind food assistance across Ukraine. The majority of people were reached in Kharkivska oblast (around 406,000 people), followed by Zaporizka (173,000) and Dnipropetrovska (more than 174,000). These figures do not represent unique recipients of aid but the numbers of food assistance and/or services provided.

  • Cluster partners are actively developing plans to provide assistance to the areas of Kharkivska and Khersonska oblasts back under Ukraine’s control in coordination with the respective oblast authorities and with the Cluster’s support.

  • In August, the Сluster partners provided livelihood, agricultural and non-agricultural grants and assets to 3,500 people, including 1,500 internally displaced people, in Cherkaska oblast.

Gaps

  • An assessment of the needs of people in the areas back under the Government of Ukraine’s control is required to ensure a timely and effective response. Some of the newly accessible areas have severely damaged infrastructure, limiting the people’s ability capacity to cook, which needs to be taken into account when delivering assistance.

  • Contamination by mines and unexploded ordnance delays assessments needed to determine needs in food assistance and livelihood support and respond to them in a timely manner.

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Situation Report

Cluster Status

Health

8.6M
people reached

Needs

  • Some 14.5 million people in Ukraine are estimated to need health assistance.

  • According to the Ministry of Health, health facilities in areas back under the Government of Ukraine’s control have suffered significant damage, with some of them being completely destroyed. One of the main critical needs, according to the Ministry, is the provision of medicines and medical assistance to people with chronic diseases who have been deprived of access to health care for months.

Response

  • As of 15 September, the Cluster coordinated the work of 152 international and local partners with planned, ongoing and/or completed health-related activities in 591 Ukrainian settlements. By mid-September, the Cluster partners reached an estimated 8.6 million people across Ukraine.

  • The Cluster is working closely with health authorities and partners to coordinate the rapid and effective response to improve access to health care for people in need in the areas back under the Government’s control.

  • The United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) in Ukraine and the European Union supported the launch of a new website with information for people with disabilities and older people, which is also fully accessible.

  • The World Health Organization (WHO) and the UN Children’s Fund (UNICEF) delivered 400,000 doses of Comirnaty mRNA vaccine against COVID-19 developed by Pfizer/BioNTech.

Gaps

  • According to the World Health Organization (WHO) Surveillance System for Attacks on Health Care, there have been 550 attacks on health care, resulting in 129 injuries and 100 deaths, reported between 24 February and 21 September. Attacks on health care deprive people of urgently needed care, endanger health-care providers and undermine health systems.

  • Access to health care continues to be severely impacted by security concerns, restricted mobility, broken supply chains and mass displacement.

  • According to the Round 8 of the International Organization for Migration Internal Displacement Report, slightly over a quarter (26 per cent) of people living in villages in Ukraine do not have access to operational medical facilities. For the displaced people currently living in villages, this figure rises to 30 per cent.

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Situation Report

Cluster Status

Protection

5.7M
people received protection assistance

Needs

  • Some 2.1 million people out of the 7.8 million targeted under the revised Flash Appeal remain in need of protection interventions in Ukraine. Overall, some 17.7 million people are in need of protection services until the end of 2022.

Response

  • The Cluster partners have provided protection services to 5.7 million people.

  • The Cluster is working to identify the partners that are available to support the conduct of assessments and provide immediate services in 30 newly accessible settlements in Kharkivska oblast.

  • The Cluster is directly engaging with partners on the ground in Kharkivska and Poltavska oblast to improve the coordination and the response in the areas where there are increased needs.

  • In the past weeks, the western oblasts have been reporting a significant increase in the arrival of new internally displaced people. The Cluster partners are engaging with relevant authorities to address some of the internally displaced people’s most pressing needs. The lack of legal documents is reported as a major concern.

Gaps

  • There is an increased need for mine risk awareness education and training for both internally displaced people returning to their habitual places of residence affected or previously affected by hostilities and people residing in areas back under the Government’s control. Training sessions for students may also be conducted as part of awareness-raising campaigns.

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Situation Report

Cluster Status

Child Protection

Needs

  • Some 2.8 million children are in need of child protection interventions in Ukraine.

Response

  • As of 21 September, the Child Protection subcluster partners reached over 41,000 children and their families with child protection case management services and referral support.

  • Over 123,000 children and caregivers were reached with psychosocial support activities to help them deal with the distressing effects of the war and displacement.

  • Together with Terre Des Hommes and the oblast administration, the subcluster launched an oblast coordination forum in Ivano-Frankivska oblast. A regional coordination forum was also launched in Kyivska oblast in cooperation with the Oblast Centre for Social Services.

  • Over 60 Rapid Response Multidisciplinary Teams (mobile teams) supported by the UN Children’s Fund have been providing various protection services to war-affected families and children in western, central and eastern Ukraine. In total, professionals (psychologists, social, legal and medical workers) in the mobile teams provided integrated support services to over 300,000 children and adults, including more than 33,000 online.

Gaps

NSTR

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Situation Report

Cluster Status

Shelter and Non-food Items (NFI)

1.4M
people reached

Needs

  • Some 11.2 million people require NFI assistance. The Cluster partners target 4.1 million people through the end of the year.

Response

  • As of 15 September, 1.4 million people were reached by Cluster partners with assistance. Nearly 1.2 million people have been reached with non-food items, and 114,000 people have benefitted from emergency shelter support.

Gaps

  • The timely reporting from partners remains a challenge, preventing the Cluster from having a better picture of existing gaps.

  • The Cluster’s coordination capacity at sub-national and oblast levels remains limited.

  • The Cluster is piloting the nomination of focal points from the shelter partners on the ground to improve its coordination capacity and outreach.

    There have been numerous requests for heating equipment and fuel from local authorities to prepare for the upcoming cold months. However, partners’ capacities remain limited. International and local procurement is currently underway to help bridge the existing gaps.

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Situation Report

Cluster Status

Water, Sanitation and Hygiene (WASH)

4.96M
people reached

Needs

  • Some 16 million people in Ukraine are in need of water, sanitation and hygiene assistance between March and December 2022. These include internally displaced people in collective centres and host communities, in addition to communities affected by hostilities-related damages to systems and limitations in water treatment consumables. As a consequence, there is an elevated risk of WASH-related diseases in affected areas.

Response

  • As of 21 September, WASH Cluster partners have reached 4.96 million people in Ukraine with some form of WASH-related interventions. More information on the distribution and nature of the response can be found on the WASH sectorial dashboard.

  • The vast majority of aid recipients have been reached through operations and maintenance support to service providers and damage repairs (3.2 million people), followed by people receiving WASH-related household items (1.25 million) and those reached with emergency water supplies (637,000). In addition, 159,000 have benefited from sanitation facility repairs or installations in various institutions and collective centres. Only some 2,100 people have been reported benefiting from health-care facility heating system repairs.

Gaps

  • More sustainable approaches need to be found for water-scarce settlements near the front line and in areas back under the Government’s control.

  • Relatively few organizations are prepared to respond to potential damages in district heating networks during the cold months.

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Situation Report

Sector Status

Multipurpose cash (MPC)

3.6M
people received cash assistance

Needs

  • In total, 17.7 million people need humanitarian aid, and partners in Ukraine are targeting 6.3 million to receive assistance through multipurpose cash totalling US$1.72 billion between March and December 2022.

Response

  • As of 21 September, 3.57 million people have received multipurpose cash assistance, amounting to $735.1 million.

  • Following the decision of the Humanitarian Country Team, the harmonized transfer cash value in Ukraine will be maintained at the current rate (UAH2,220 per person per month) through the end of the year.

  • The deduplication exercise conducted by the Cash Working Group has allowed to analyze and avoid potential unintended overlap for 1.1 million unique households. As a result, this exercise has helped prevent the disbursement of $35 million in cash assistance to recipients who have already received such assistance. This funding will be redirected to proceed with an additional 185,000 cash transfers.

Gaps

  • In the areas back under the Government’s control, the feasibility of providing cash assistance is being further analyzed to reach those most in need with the most appropriate and timely form of assistance.

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Situation Report

Cluster Status

Emergency Telecommunications

Needs

  • The quality of telecommunications services has deteriorated due to persistent hacking activity attempts, channel jamming, spamming/phishing, and other forms of network sabotaging. As a result, almost all internet service providers and Global System for Mobile communication (GSM) service providers have regular episodes of service outages.

Response

  • In September, the ETC delivered security communications training to 22 World Food Programme staff members in Kyiv, bringing the total number of UN staff trained to 117.

Gaps

Nothing significant to report.

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Cluster Status

Logistics

Needs

  • Logistics constraints are mainly linked to access to hard-to-reach areas, which poses challenges to organizations in the forward movement and staging of humanitarian cargo.

Response

  • Between 12 and 16 September, the Logistics Cluster supported 43 partners through coordination, information management activities, as well as common logistics services.

  • Three information management products and updates were published on the dedicated Ukraine operation webpage.

  • The Logistics Cluster has moved to a new warehouse in Odesa, which has a total common storage capacity of 2,500 m2.

  • During the same reporting period, 586 m3 of humanitarian relief items were received in common storage, and 144 m3 were released. As of 16 September, the Logistics Cluster held nearly 4,680 m3 of humanitarian cargo from 13 partners across four common storage sites in Ukraine.

  • The Logistics Cluster consolidated cargo and facilitated access to 17 trucks for two inter-agency convoys, which reached Shevchenkove (Kharkivska oblast) on 16 and 17 September, with relief items on behalf of six partners.

Gaps

  • There is limited availability of logistics services in hard-to-reach areas in the south and east of the country.

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Situation Report
Trends

Funding as of 21 September

On 8 August, the UN and partners released the revised Flash Appeal for Ukraine, covering the period between March and December 2022. Under the revised Flash Appeal, humanitarian organizations seek US$4.29 billion to support 11.5 million people in need, which is a 90 per cent increase in the financial requirements compared with the previous revision carried out in April.

As of 21 September, humanitarian organizations in Ukraine received 66 per cent of the $4.29 billion requested in the ten-month Humanitarian Flash Appeal. Some 68 per cent of the funding received has come from the United States ($1.25 billion), the European Commission ($293.8 million), Germany ($175.4 million), Japan ($118.4 million) and Canada ($87.1 million). In addition, business contributions from 482 private sector donors to the humanitarian response in Ukraine have reached over $1.6 billion.

The Ukraine Humanitarian Fund (UHF) has been an essential source of funding for relief operations in the country. Since 24 February, the UHF has allocated $117 million to 67 projects implemented by 40 partners nationwide, cumulatively targeting 5 million people, focusing on the eastern and northern parts of the country. Some 19 per cent of the funds have been allocated directly to 11 national organizations, which are implementing at least 21 projects close to the front lines, supporting some of the most critically vulnerable people. The remaining 43 per cent of funding was allocated to 21 international NGOs and 37 per cent to 8 UN agencies.

On 1 September, the UHF launched its first 2022 Standard Allocation of $70 million. This is the largest single Allocation launched since the creation of the Fund in 2019. The 2022 Standard Allocation will kick-start prioritized activities under the revised Humanitarian Flash Appeal, including time-critical winterization assistance. These funds will allow partners to support internally displaced people, including evacuees, returnees and other vulnerable people on both sides of the front line directly impacted by Russia’s war on Ukraine. Projects from national organizations and organizations supporting local Ukrainian partners on the front lines will be prioritized for funding, as will those that aim to address the needs of people with disabilities, older people and vulnerable women. More information about this Allocation and deadlines is available here. Information about different Allocation modalities is also available here.

Since the beginning of the year, donors and partners have contributed nearly $224.2 million to the UHF, helping those most affected by the war, including $204.8 in pad contributions and $19.4 in pledged contributions. The biggest donors to the UHF in 2022 have so far been the United Kingdom ($42 million), Canada ($31 million), Germany ($28.9 million), the Netherlands ($22 million) and the United States ($20 million).

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Situation Report
Emergency Response

Useful contacts

  • PROTECTION FROM SEXUAL EXPLOITATION AND ABUSE (PSEA) Humanitarian aid is free! If someone asks you to pay, do something inappropriate or perform any favour or sexual action in exchange for help, say no and email seareferral@un.org or call our partner hotline 0-800-309-110 / 0-800-30-77-11 / 0-800-331-800

  • FOR NGOs For more information on how to engage in the Ukraine humanitarian response, contact Mario Trutmann at trutmann@un.org.

  • HUMANITARIAN NOTIFICATION SYSTEM (HNS) For more information on the HNS, please contact Ivane Bochorishvili at bochorishvili@un.org.

  • FOR PRIVATE SECTOR While humanitarian aid is needed urgently, OCHA urges companies to refrain from sending unsolicited donations that may not correspond to identified needs or meet international quality standards. Donors are encouraged to send financial/cash donations rather than in-kind donations. However, for businesses wishing to contribute in-kind goods or services, please reach out to (OCHA) with as much detail as possible, including what you wish to donate and how much, your time frame for delivery, details on shipping and any other conditions. We will then guide you to the most appropriate recipient organization(s). For more information, please contact Karen Smith, OCHA’s Private Sector Engagement Advisor, at ochaers-ps@un.org.

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